NASA Announces New Dragonfly Drone Mission to Explore Titan

Lauren Hinkel | EAPS News
Tuesday, July 9, 2019

NASA recently announced that it would be sending a drone-style quadcopter to Saturn's largest moon, The New York Times and others report.

Dragonfly, as the mission is called, will be capable of soaring across the skies of Titan and landing intermittently to take scientific measurements, studying the world’s mysterious atmosphere and topography while searching for hints of life on the only world other than Earth in our solar system with standing liquid on its surface. The mission will be developed and led from the Applied Physics Laboratory at Johns Hopkins University in Laurel, Md.

“This revolutionary mission would have been unthinkable just a few years ago,” said Jim Bridenstine, the administrator of NASA, in a video statement announcing the mission.

The spacecraft is scheduled to launch in 2026. Once at Titan in 2034, Dragonfly will have a life span of at least two-and-a-half years, with a battery that will be recharged with a radioactive power source between flights. Cameras on Dragonfly will stream images during flight, offering people on Earth a bird’s-eye view of the Saturn moon.

Story Image: NASA's Dragonfly mission will arrive at Titan, Saturn's largest moon, in 2034, flying across its surface to study how the planet's conditions might resemble those on Earth before life formed. (Credit: NASA/JHUAPL)