Pop Goes the Seafloor Rock

Maris Wicks | WHOI
June 20, 2017

MIT-WHOI Joint Program graduate student Meghan Jones studies seafloor lavas to reveal the inner workings of our planet. Using the human-occupied submersible Alvin and the autonomous underwater vehicle Sentry Jones has been exploring a surprising discovery: gas-filled volcanic rocks on the seafloor that "pop" when brought up to the surface.

Read this story at Oceanus

Image credit: Maris Wicks


Meghan Jones is studying for a PhD in geology and geophysics through the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (MIT/WHOI) Joint Program in Oceanography. Her research combines geochemical and geophysical investigations which seek to understand submarine eruption dynamics. While at WHOI, she has been involved in field and laboratory studies of volcanic features at Axial Volcano, Havre Volcano, the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and the Galápagos Platform, using the human-occupied submersible Alvin and the autonomous underwater vehicle Sentry to study seafloor lavas that reveal the inner workings of our planet. Involvement in these projects have allowed her to become immersed, not only in the physical ocean itself, but also in the technical aspects of sonar imaging, remote characterization of the seafloor, and signal processing. Her research has also enabled her to collaborate in science outreach with the BBC, Atlantic Productions, and several blogs.