IAP 2015

Non-Credit Activities  go to listings

For Credit Subjects

12.091/12.S593  MATLAB Bootcamp 
Dan Amhrein, Jaap Nienhuis, Neesha Schnepf

MTWRF Jan 26-30; 02:00-03:30pm, 54-819

Email Vicki McKenna <vsm [at] mit [dot] edu> to register and attend first class. 
Listeners allowed, space permitting 
Level: U 3 units Graded P/D/F
Graduate students are welcome to attend. 

New to MatLab or have limited experience? This class helps you make the transition from Excel to MATLAB and gets you started with the basics that you'll need to use MATLAB in a class. Course includes: getting MATLAB started on your computer, learning how to start programming, building skills, solving problems. It provides resources for future reference. 

Students develop skills in:

  • plotting and graphics
  • calling matlab functions  
  • I/O dealing with input of data
  • understanding  loops and control of flow
  • writing scripts 
Examples used in the class are motivated by typical applications in the Earth Sciences. Days 4 and 5 will involve working in groups on selected problems. Instructors interact with the groups and answer questions on an individual basis. Students present their code at the end of the class.
 

Before the first class, please visit this site to download and install MATLAB onto your personal computer/laptop: http://kb.mit.edu/confluence/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=7144438

If you have any trouble installing MATLAB, please email Neesha <nschnepf [at] MIT [dot] EDU>. If you are a Linux user, email Dan <dan [dot] amrhein [at] gmail [dot] com>.

Contact for any questions: Vicki McKenna vsm [at] mit [dot] edu


12.093  Delivering Energy at Scale: Science, Technology, and Sustainable Development 
Richard Sears, David Patrick Murphy, and Rob van der Hilst

TWRF Jan 20-23; 01:00-05:00pm, 54-517

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class. 
Listeners allowed, space permitting 
Level: U 3 units Graded P/D/F

Oil and natural gas provide approximately two-thirds of primary energy today, and will continue to be major sources of energy for several decades. The course will introduce today's energy systems and the state of the art geoscience and engineering approaches necessary to meet current demand. Participants will work in teams, to design and present plans for the development of a multi-billion dollar natural gas project with the potential to supply energy for over three million households. The course will look at how technology, economics, society and sustainability must be balanced to deliver energy efficiently and in a manner that all stakeholders would regard as responsible. 

Contact: Richard Sears, rsears [at] mit [dot] edu


12.141 Electron Microprobe Analysis
Nilanjan Chatterjee 

TR, Jan. 13 and 15; 20 and 22, 54-1221; 1-5 pm

Selection by departmental lottery. Do not pre-register on WebSIS.
Enter lottery by: 9-Jan-2013
Limited to 8 participants.
No listeners
Prereq: —
Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F

Introduction to the theory of x-ray microanalysis through the electron microprobe including ZAF matrix corrections. Techniques to be discussed are wavelength and energy dispersive spectrometry, scanning backscattered electron, secondary electron, cathodoluminescence, and x-ray imaging. Lab sessions involve use of the electron microprobe. Offered for undergraduate credit, but persons interested in an in-depth discussion of quantitative x-ray analysis are invited to participate. Students will be required to complete lab exercises to obtain credit. Find required reading at URL.
Web: http://web.mit.edu/e-probe/www/courses.shtml 

Contact: Dr. Nilanjan Chatterjee, 54-1216, x3-1995, e-probe-www [at] mit [dot] edu to enter the lottery.


12.310  An Introduction to Weather Forecasting
Lodovica Illari

Dates MWF, Jan. 12-Jan. 30; 01:30-03:00 pm, 54-915

Limited to 50 participants.
Listeners allowed, space permitting
Prereq: 8.01, 18.01
Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F

Basic principles of synoptic meteorology and weather forecasting. Analysis of hourly weather data and numerical weather prediction models. Regular preparation of weather forecasts.
Guest lecture by local TV meteorologist.
Web: http://www-paoc.mit.edu/synoptic/courses/12.310/12310.htm

Contact: Lodovica Illari, 54-1612, x3-2286, illari [at] mit [dot] edu


12.411 Astronomy Field Camp
12.611 Astronomy Field Camp 
Amanda Bosh

Schedule: Jan 5-25, 2014

Prereq:  12.410j/8.287
Limited to 6 participants
Level:  9 units, graded P/D/F
Fee:  $200.00 for travel
Do not pre-register on WebSIS. Contact Dr. Amanda Bosh for application asbosh [at] MIT [dot] EDU.
Enter lottery by: Oct. 30, 2013

Astronomy field camp at Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona. Students will participate in astronomical research with astronomers at Lowell Obs. Topics will vary by year. This class includes tours of local astronomical facilities and discussions with local astronomers. Students will present results of their research at the Lowell Obs. colloquium series at the end of the class. Priority will be given to declared Course 12 and Course 8 Majors, Astronomy Minors, Seniors, Juniors, and by date of class registration. Final enrollment decisions are made by the Instructor.

Contact: Amanada Bosh, asbosh [at] mit [dot] edu

Non-Credit Activities

2015 IAP Lecture Series:Origin of Life        See sCHEDULE

The origin of life and the nature of its common ancestry is one of humanity’s greatest unanswered questions, and has remained mysterious despite over half a century of serious scientific inquiry. Knowledge of the mechanism, timing, and setting of life’s origin not only greatly enriches our understanding of biology, but also directly informs our understanding of planetary processes and conditions on the Early Earth, and provides an astrobiological context to our place within the Universe. With the advent and expansion of genomic technology, powerful new tools are now available to investigate our origins as never before. This seminar highlights the work of researchers applying the tools of genomics, molecular evolution, and synthetic biology to these challenging problems, and the remarkable insights that can be gained from new computational and experimental techniques.

The origin of life and the nature of its common ancestry is one of humanity’s greatest unanswered questions, and has remained mysterious despite over half a century of serious scientific inquiry. Knowledge of the mechanism, timing, and setting of life’s origin not only greatly enriches our understanding of biology, but also directly informs our understanding of planetary processes and conditions on the Early Earth, and provides an astrobiological context to our place within the Universe. With the advent and expansion of genomic technology, powerful new tools are now available to investigate our origins as never before.  This seminar highlights the work of researchers applying the tools of genomics, molecular evolution, and synthetic biology to these challenging problems, and the remarkable insights that can be gained from new computational and experimental techniques. 

Communication Science Through Film - a series of two talks
Prof. Dena Seidel, Director of the Rutgers Center for Digital Filmmaking and an Assistant Professor in the Mason Gross School of the Arts
Seidel is an award winning filmmaker and the Director/Producer of the soon to be release feature documentary Antarctica: Beyond the Ice funded by the National Science Foundation and featuring an inter-disciplinary research team studying climate change in one of the most rapidly changing parts of the world.

Creative Ocean and Earth Science Filmaking
Ocean and Earth research can be shaped into compelling science discovery narratives for the screen. Film narratives allow audiences to vicariously experiences a scientists’ processes of discovery, beginning with an interest in knowing more about the natural world to the methods used to test a hypothesis  that eventually led to discoveries. Using examples of her own award winning films, Seidel will speak about ways oceanographers and atmospheric scientists can collaborate with filmmakers to create engaging documentaries about their research for large audiences.  Dec. 14, Noon-1pm, 54-915


Communicating your Reseach to the Public through Film
This is a pivotal moment in the development of science communication. Documentary narratives told from the perspective of featured scientists can effectivelycommunicate science in a way that is meaningful, relevant, and accessible to the public. Public understand of the work scientists do is essential for continued research funding and attracting young people to STEM fields. Seidel will share her experience as a filmmaker and researcher creating cinematic narratives that engage non-scientists and the larger public in science learning.  Dec. 15, Noon-1pm, 54-915

Introduction to ocean data-model analysis
Gael Forget

Thursday and Friday, Jan. 15 and 16, Jan 22 and 23, Jan 29, 10-11:30 pm, 54-1623 
Limited to 15 participants, advance sign up required
Multi session event

The analysis of observations and modeling are intertwined components of modern observational oceanogrphy. This class intends to inform students and postocs of the wealth of ocean data and models that are readily available to them at MIT - including, but not liminted to, collections of Argo profiles and MITgcm output. The class will proceed through lectures and interacitve MATLAB sessions. The use of models as part of low level data processing, and within higher level data synthesis, will be exposed during the lectures by taking examples from recent and ongoing research. The interactive MATLAB sessions will aim to enable attendees to take advantage of available data and models for their own research.
Contact: Dr. Gael Forget, 54-1423, (617) 452-2977, gforget [at] mit [dot] edu

Contact information